HudsonAlpha secures $3.9 million from National Science Foundation to work toward the crops of tomorrow

 The HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology along with partners at the University of Nebraska will work on understanding how sorghum responds to nitrogen-based fertilizer and educating the next generation of scientists in Agrigenomics. The opportunity comes from a four-year, $3.9 million grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF).

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Register today for the 2019 CROPS conference

Registration is now open for the 2019 CROPS conference! Hosted by the HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology and the University of Georgia, the 3rd CROPS conference is focused on integrating and translating genomic knowledge to improve breeding and crop production.

The CROPS conference brings together leading researchers applying genomic-based techniques to crop improvement and plant molecular breeding experts, along with traditional breeders who are interested in applying these techniques within their crops of interest.

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HudsonAlpha researchers help create roadmap to understanding the sugarcane genome

Mapping out the genome of sugarcane just got a little bit easier, thanks to a paper published in Nature this July. Researchers at the HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology helped generate the tiling path, sequence samples and provide analysis of the complex plant.

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Cotton goes to space: HudsonAlpha and Clemson University selected for Cotton Sustainability Project on International Space Station

Huntsville, Ala. ━ A Clemson University and HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology project to explore the cotton genome and how it reacts differently in micro-gravity and normal gravity has been selected as a winner in the Cotton Sustainability Challenge. The Challenge, run by the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space, and sponsored by Target Corporation, provided researcher and innovators the opportunity to propose solutions to improve crop production on Earth by sending their concepts to the International Space Station (ISS) U.S. National Laboratory.

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Genes found in drought-resistant plants could accelerate evolution of water-use efficient crops

HudsonAlpha researchers collaborated on a project led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory identifying a common set of genes that different drought-resistant plants to survive in semi-arid conditions. This discovery could play a significant role in bioengineering and creating energy crops that are tolerant to water deficits.

Read the full press release from Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

At CROPS 2017, SMRT Sequencing powers reference plant genome assemblies

This week, HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology and the University of Georgia are co-hosting CROPS 2017, a meeting focused on
genomic technologies and their use in crop improvement and breeding programs.

The three-day event attracts more than 200 attendees involved in research and breeding for a range of important crop species. PacBio was proud to be a sponsor of the conference.

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HudsonAlpha to host conference on crop improvement June 5-8

Huntsville, Ala. — HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology, in collaboration with the University of Georgia, will host the second CROPS conference June 5-8, 2017, bringing together leading genomics researchers and plant breeders from around the world.

CROPS will address the intersection of newly emerging genomic technologies and their application to crop improvement.

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Upland cotton sequence now publicly available

A consortium led by Z. Jeffrey Chen of The University of Texas at Austin and Jane Grimwood and Jeremy Schmutz of HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology has made publicly available a significantly improved high-quality genome sequence of Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum). This sequence of the species making up greater than 90% of the world’s spinnable cotton fiber builds upon previous genome sequences published in the past five years.

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Speciation in flowering mustard plant driven by alleles adapted to local conditions

HudsonAlpha faculty investigator part of team that identified chromosomal inversion

On the slopes of the Northern Rocky Mountains, the flowering mustard plant Boechera stricta is undergoing a quiet transformation – that is, evolving into a fitter species better adapted to its local environment. HudsonAlpha faculty investigator Jeremy Schmutz was part of a team led by Thomas Mitchell-Olds of Duke University who analyzed the mechanisms by which Boechera stricta living in a hybrid zone in the Northern Rocky Mountains experienced positive directional selection. Their study was published in Nature Ecology and Evolution in April 2017.

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First marine flowering plant genome sequenced by HudsonAlpha researchers

Genome gives insight to extreme genetic plant adaptations

Huntsville, Ala. — Three researchers from the HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology successfully performed DNA sequencing on a new plant genome, Zostera – an eelgrass that is the first of its kind to be sequenced. The work was part of a six-year project with the Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI) that could help researchers understand how plants adapt to extreme environmental changes. The results of the project were published online in Nature on January 27.

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