Contact Info

Email: gcooper@hudsonalpha.org
Phone: (256) 327-9490
Location: 601 Genome Way, Huntsville, AL 35806

Greg Cooper, PhD

Human Genetics and Genomics

Greg Cooper, PhD, is a faculty investigator at the HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology. Throughout his career, Cooper has focused on understanding the structures, functions and evolutionary histories of individual human genomes and finding ways to translate that understanding into useful predictions about human health and disease. Cooper earned a PhD in genetics from Stanford University in 2006. He completed postdoctoral research at the University of Washington in 2009 before joining HudsonAlpha in 2010.

2001-2006 PhD in Genetics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA

1997-2001 BS in Mathematics and Statistics, BA in Microbiology, summa cum laude, Miami University, Oxford, OH

2010-Present Faculty Investigator, HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology, Huntsville, AL

2010-Present Adjunct Instructor, Department of Genetics, University of Alabama at Birmingham

2009-2010 Acting Assistant Professor, Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA

2006-2009 Senior Fellow, Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, Advisors: Evan E. Eichler and Deborah A. Nickerson

2001-2006 PhD Student, Department of Genetics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, Advisor: Arend Sidow, Thesis: Evolutionary constraints on the human genome

2007 UW Genome Training Grant Postdoctoral Fellowship

2007-2010 Merck, Jane Coffin Childs Memorial Fund Postdoctoral Fellowship

2001-2006 Howard Hughes Medical Institute Doctoral Fellowship

1999-2001 Goldwater Scholar

1997-2001 Harrison Scholar, Miami University

Recent New

October 17, 2019
HudsonAlpha scientists secured a grant to create a high quality map of relatively unexplored genetic regions of the brain, specifically looking for the effects of Alzheimer disease. Jacob Loupe, PhD, a senior scientist at HudsonAl...
October 17, 2019
Victor and Jeannette Vega of Madison, Ala. noticed their daughter, Tiana, was falling behind in her development. They spent two years searching for an answer and finally found one through the Clinical Sequencing and Exploratory R...
September 10, 2019
The Undiagnosed Diseases Program at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) recently found a previously unknown genetic variant that is believed to account for a severe movement disorder in a young woman. In a case study pub...
Load More