• All
  • Joint and Adjunct Faculty
  • Faculty
  • Adjunct Faculty
  • Richard M. Myers, PhD
    Richard M. Myers, PhD
    Faculty Investigator
  • Howard Jacob, PhD
    Howard Jacob, PhD
    Faculty Investigator
  • David Bick, MD
    David Bick, MD
    Faculty Investigator
  • Devin Absher, PhD
    Devin Absher, PhD
    Faculty Investigator
  • Elizabeth Worthey, PhD
    Elizabeth Worthey, PhD
    Faculty Investigator
  • Greg Barsh, MD, PhD
    Greg Barsh, MD, PhD
    Faculty Investigator
  • Greg Cooper, PhD
    Greg Cooper, PhD
    Faculty Investigator
  • Jane Grimwood, PhD
    Jane Grimwood, PhD
    Faculty Investigator
  • Jeremy Schmutz
    Jeremy Schmutz
    Faculty Investigator
  • Jian Han, MD, PhD
    Jian Han, MD, PhD
    Faculty Investigator
  • Jozef Lazar, MD, PhD
    Jozef Lazar, MD, PhD
    Research Investigator
  • Kankshita Swaminathan, PhD
    Kankshita Swaminathan, PhD
    Faculty Investigator
  • Kimberly Strong, PhD
    Kimberly Strong, PhD
    Faculty Investigator
  • Neil Lamb, PhD
    Neil Lamb, PhD
    Faculty Investigator
  • Sara Cooper, PhD
    Sara Cooper, PhD
    Faculty Investigator
  • Shawn Levy, PhD
    Shawn Levy, PhD
    Faculty Investigator
  • Le Su, PhD
    Le Su, PhD
    Junior Fellow
  • Akinyemi I. Ojesina, MD, PhD
    Akinyemi I. Ojesina, MD, PhD
    Adjunct Faculty with UAB
  • Anna C. E. Hurst, MD, MS
    Anna C. E. Hurst, MD, MS
    Adjunct Faculty with UAB
  • Bruce R. Korf, MD, PhD
    Bruce R. Korf, MD, PhD
    Adjunct Faculty with UAB
  • Eric Mendenhall, PhD
    Eric Mendenhall, PhD
    Adjunct Faculty with UAH
  • Haydeh Payami, PhD
    Haydeh Payami, PhD
    Joint Faculty with UAB
  • Luciano M. Matzkin, PhD
    Luciano M. Matzkin, PhD
    Adjunct Faculty with UAH
  • Pankaj Arora, MD, FAHA
    Pankaj Arora, MD, FAHA
    Adjunct Faculty with UAB
Richard M. Myers, PhD
Faculty Investigator

Rick-Myers

Visit Website

Ph.D. in Biochemistry, University of California Berkeley

Genomic and genetic analysis of human traits and diseases.

Richard Myers, PhD, is president and scientific director at HudsonAlpha. Myer’s lab focuses on applying functional genomics and genetics approaches to understanding how genes and regulatory regions contribute to basic biology, human disease, responses to the environment and population genetics.

Howard Jacob, PhD
Faculty Investigator

Howard-Jacob

Visit Website

PhD in Pharmacology, University of Iowa

Genomics, common human disease
Howard Jacob, PhD, uses molecular genetics to understand complex, multifactorial disease. As executive vice president for genomic medicine at HudsonAlpha, Jacob brings together genome sequencing, bioinformatics and basic research to make a clinical diagnosis possible for patients.

David Bick, MD
Faculty Investigator

David-Bick

Visit Website

MD, George Washington University School of Medicine
Human clinical genetics

David Bick, MD, PhD, is a clinical geneticist with more than 20 years experience diagnosing and treating children with genetic disorders. Bick is the medical director of the Clinic for Genomic Medicine on the HudsonAlpha campus.

Devin Absher, PhD
Faculty Investigator

Visit Website

Ph.D. in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Emory University

Epigenomic analysis of complex human traits and diseases

Devin Absher, PhD, uses the epigenome to study complex diseases and traits, especially autoimmune disease, cardiovascular disease, cancer and aging.

Elizabeth Worthey, PhD
Faculty Investigator

Liz-Worthey

Visit Website

PhD in Genetics, Imperial College, London, UK

Clinical and translational use of genomic data
Liz Worthey, PhD, uses genomics and informatics to define the genetic underpinnings of human disease. In addition to her research goals, as the director of software development and informatics, she leads her team in supporting the informatics goals of the institute as well as the clinical mission to provide definitive diagnoses for patients.

Greg Barsh, MD, PhD
Faculty Investigator

Greg-Barsh

Visit Website

M.D. and Ph.D. in pathology, University of Washington, Seattle

Genetic architecture of morphologic variation

Greg Barsh, PhD, MD, studies the genetic mechanisms that underlie differences in individual appearance and that could give new insight into both basic biology and human disease.

Greg Cooper, PhD
Faculty Investigator

Greg-Cooper

Visit Website

Ph.D. in Genetics, Stanford University

Human Genetics and Genomics

Greg Cooper, PhD, researches the structures, functions and evolutionary histories of human genomes, with an emphasis on applying genomic approaches to study human disease.

Jane Grimwood, PhD
Faculty Investigator

Jane-Grimwood

Visit Website

Ph.D. in Microbiology, University of Leeds, United Kingdom

Genomic resource development for plants

Jane Grimwood, PhD, co-directs the Genome Sequencing Center at HudsonAlpha, managing one of the few centers in the world that produces, analyzes and interprets genomic data on economically important plant and organism species to improve crop breeding and other agricultural practices.

Jeremy Schmutz
Faculty Investigator

Jeremy-Schmutz

Visit Website

B.S. in computer science, B.S. in biology, North Central College

Whole genome sequencing and assembly, population genomics

Jeremy Schmutz co-directs the Genome Sequencing Center at HudsonAlpha, managing one of the few centers in the world that produces, analyzes and interprets genomic data on economically important plant and organism species to improve crop breeding and other agricultural practices.

Jian Han, MD, PhD
Faculty Investigator

Jian-Han

Visit Website

M.D., SuZhou Medical College, China; Ph.D. University of Alabama at Birmingham

Technology development to advance medical science

Jian Han, MD, PhD, focuses on developing integrated solutions for molecular differential diagnosis and mapping the personalized immunorepertoire.

Jozef Lazar, MD, PhD
Research Investigator

Josef-Lazar

Visit Website

MD, Comenius University, Martin, Czechoslovakia

PhD in Physiology, Comenius University, Bratislava, Czechoslovakia

Genomics, Common Human Diseases
The ultimate goal for personalized genomic medicine is tailoring treatment. Because we expect the majority of patients to have a unique sequence variant, tailoring treatment for patients with rare disease will require validation nominated sequence variants using different molecular biology approaches. In the validation process, the Lazar lab will utilize primary patients or commercially available human cell lines for different cellular assays or vertebrate model system using gene editing to generate and functionally test the variant of interest. The goal of Lazar’s work is to develop a functional screening program to rapidly test variants or genes identified in individual clinical cases and testing potential treatment modalities

Kankshita Swaminathan, PhD
Faculty Investigator

PhD in Biology, Dartmouth College

Understanding the role of the rhizome in resource reallocation and perenniality.

Kankshita Swaminathan, PhD, studies the role of the rhizome in nutrient storage and reproduction in plants. She is interested in how perennial plants remobilize nutrients year after year.

Kimberly Strong, PhD
Faculty Investigator

Kim-Strong

Visit Website

PhD in Bioethics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW Australia

Genomics and Ethics
Kim Strong, PhD, is a genetics-trained bioethicist, a scientist who studies the application and limits of empirical ethics, particularly as it relates to contentious and emerging genetic technologies.

Neil Lamb, PhD
Faculty Investigator

Neil-Lamb

Visit Website

Ph.D. in Genetics and Molecular Biology, Emory University

Educational outreach relating to genetics, genomics and biotechnology

Neil Lamb, PhD, oversees all educational programming developed at HudsonAlpha as vice president for educational outreach. Lamb creates innovative teacher training, student experiences, public enrichment, classroom kits and digital resources that re-shape how science education is delivered.

Sara Cooper, PhD
Faculty Investigator

Sara-Cooper

Visit Website

Ph.D. in Genetics, Stanford University

Metabolomics

Sara Cooper, PhD, focuses on combining metabolomics with genomics and applying that data to pancreatic and ovarian cancer.  

Shawn Levy, PhD
Faculty Investigator

Shawn-Levy

Visit Website

Ph.D. in Biochemistry, Emory University

Technology development and automation, informatics, genomic variation

Shawn Levy, PhD, uses high performance genotyping and sequencing technologies to support projects from plant and animal phylogenetic studies to translational and clinical based projects at the Genomic Services Laboratory and the Clinical Services Laboratory.

Le Su, PhD
Junior Fellow

Visit Website

PhD in Cell Biology, University of British Columbia, Canada

Molecular mechanisms of sarcomagenesis.

Le Su, PhD, has been actively involved in sarcoma research for nearly ten years. As a junior fellow at HudsonAlpha, his major focus is on chromosomal translocation-associated sarcomagenesis in children and young adults.

Akinyemi I. Ojesina, MD, PhD
Adjunct Faculty with UAB

MD, University of Ibadan, Nigeria; PhD, Biological Sciences in Public Health, Harvard University

Cancer Genomics, Infection-related cancers; Women’s cancers; Biomarkers for early detection of cancers and disease progression

In the Ojesina Lab, we seek to answer two big questions: (i) what are the genomic events that facilitate the progression of pre-malignant states to cancer, (ii) how do infections synergize with genomic alterations to cause cancer? Our work lies at the nexus of translational genomics, integrative molecular epidemiology, oncology, infectious disease, and global health, with a primary focus on infection-related cancers (including HIV-associated malignancies) and women’s cancers. We integrate high throughput sequencing with functional experiments in primary tissues and cell lines to investigate the mechanisms by which infections synergize with genomic and transcriptomic alterations to facilitate the tumor initiation, progression, response to therapy, recurrence and patient prognosis. We anticipate that this work will have translational impact by facilitating the development of diagnostic biomarkers and predictive models for early detection, prevention and treatment of various cancers, in local and global contexts.

Anna C. E. Hurst, MD, MS
Adjunct Faculty with UAB


Clinical genetics, syndrome delineation, dysmorphology and advancing technologies, phenotype integration in genomic sequencing, care coordination for children with complex medical needs

Anna C.E. Hurst, MD, MS, is an assistant professor of medical genetics in the department of genetics at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. She trained as a genetic counselor at the University of South Carolina School of Medicine (Columbia) and then completed her medical degree at the Medical University of South Carolina (Charleston). She is a board-certified pediatrician who completed pediatrics residency at Wake Forest Baptist Health (Winston-Salem, NC) and a medical genetics residency at UAB. Hurst is a clinician for the UAB Undiagnosed Disease Program, skeletal dysplasia clinic, and general genetics, and she provides genetic inpatient hospital consultations for patients at UAB and Children’s of Alabama. Her clinical interests include dysmorphology and congenital anomaly syndrome delineation, and she serves on the Scientific Advisory Board for Facial Dysmorphology Novel Analysis (FDNA). Her research focuses on expanding the availability of genomic sequencing for children with complex healthcare needs and incorporating phenotypic information into the interpretation of genomic data.

Bruce R. Korf, MD, PhD
Adjunct Faculty with UAB

MD, Cornell University and PhD in Genetics and Cell Biology, Rockefeller University

Genetics and treatment of neurofibromatosis type 1; Genetics and genomics education; Integration of genetics into medical practice

Bruce Korf, MD, PhD, completed his undergraduate studies and MD at Cornell University and received his PhD in genetics and cell biology from Rockefeller University. He then did training in pediatrics, child neurology and genetics at Children’s Hospital, Boston, and is board certified in all three areas, as well as clinical cytogenetics and clinical molecular genetics. He served as clinical director and associate chief of the Children’s Hospital, Boston Division of Genetics until 1999, when he assumed the role of medical director of the Harvard-Partners Center for Genetics and Genomics. In 2003 he moved to University of Alabama at Birmingham, where he is the Wayne H. and Sara Crews Finley Chair in Medical Genetics, chair of the department of genetics, and director of the Heflin Center for Genomic Sciences. He also is co-director of the UAB-HudsonAlpha Center for Genomic Medicine. Korf is past president of the Association of Professors of Human and Medical Genetics and of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics and currently is president of the ACMG Foundation for Genetic and Genomic Medicine. He has served on the Liaison Committee on Medical Education and the Board of Scientific Counselors of the National Cancer Institute and of the National Human Genome Research Institute at the NIH. Korf is author of Human Genetics and Genomics, co-author of Medical Genetics at a Glance, and co-editor of Current Protocols in Human Genetics and Emery and Rimoin’s Principles and Practice of Medical Genetics. His research focus is the genetics and treatment of neurofibromatosis type 1, and he also has a major interest in genetics and genomics education and the integration of genetics into medical practice.

Eric Mendenhall, PhD
Adjunct Faculty with UAH
Eric Mendenhall, PhD

PhD in Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Minnesota

Function of regulatory regions of genome in human genome and human genetic diseases

The Mendenhall lab works to define the function of the regulatory or non-coding regions of the genome. These regions control how genes are turned on or off in the appropriate cells of our bodies. The lab focuses on developing methods to define what determines a functional regulatory region, investigating how the DNA sequence establishes these regions and understanding how variation in human DNA can alter this regulation to produce human traits and human genetic diseases. This requires the lab to develop and use specific synthetic biology tools, including customizable DNA binding proteins (TALEs and Crispr/Cas), synthetic DNA libraries and next-generation sequencing to assign biological functions to non-coding regions of the genome.

Haydeh Payami, PhD
Joint Faculty with UAB

PhD, in Genetics, University of California, Berkeley

Prevention and treatment of Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease

The Payami Lab is working towards prevention and treatment of Parkinson’s disease. PD is not a single disease: there are a myriad of genetic and environmental factors involved. The Payami lab is interested in the genes that interact with environmental risk factors – the goal being to predict who is at risk and what they should avoid; and also the genes that determine efficacy and toxicity of drugs for preventive and treatment – so that treatment can be personalized for maximum benefit for each individual. While we are on fast track for effective prevention and treatment, we are also interested in gaining a deep understanding of how the disease develops, why it progresses, why it affects so many systems of the body (physical and cognitive, psychiatric, digestive), and how best to halt it.

Luciano M. Matzkin, PhD
Adjunct Faculty with UAH

Visit Website

PhD in Ecology and Evolution, Stony Brook University

Ecological effects on speciation genetics and genomics

The Matzkin lab investigates how the ecology of a species shapes patterns of variation (from genes to genomes), how populations adapt to environmental shifts and the implication of ecological adaptation in the process of speciation. The lab focuses on a group of cactophilic Drosophila that inhabit the deserts of North America. These Drosophila species are an excellent system to study since their ecology is well understood and researchers can perform many genetic, genomic, manipulative and life history experiments on them. The lab concentrates on studying the genetic basis of adaptation; analyzing genome evolution via the sequencing and assembly of several cactophilic Drosophila species; examining the role of gene expression changes in evolution; understanding the effects of ecological adaptation in behavioral evolution and its effects on reproductive isolation; investigating speciation genetics/genomics; and exploring the relationship between molecular, expression and life history variation and evolution.

Pankaj Arora, MD, FAHA
Adjunct Faculty with UAB

Kasturba Medical College, Manipal University, India

Non-invasive cardiology, patient care, deficiencies in natriuretic peptide signaling, microRNAs, vitamin D, obesity and cardiometabolic disease

Pankaj Arora, MD, FAHA, completed his MD at Manipal University in India. He received his postdoctoral training in complex-trait genetics at Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard. He subsequently completed his clinical cardiology fellowship training at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB). Currently, Arora is an assistant professor in the division of cardiology at UAB. In addition, Arora is a past chair of the Early Career Committee of Functional Genomics and Translational Biology Council at the American Heart Association and is a member of the leadership committee. Arora’s current efforts are focused on studying genetic basis of natriuretic peptide levels in population cohorts. Arora’s laboratory is actively working with HudsonAlpha faculty investigator Devin Absher, PhD, on dissecting the molecular mechanisms behind racial differences in natriuretic peptide levels. Arora’s long-term goal is primarily to translate genetic discoveries into an improved understanding of human physiology through clinically-focused research.

Navigation

Color Skin